International Recipes and Cooking Around the World

Yorkshire Pudding

Yorkshire Pudding Recipe (English savory puff pudding)

(English savory puff pudding)

Image Creative Commons by myhsu

5
Average: 4.2 (13 votes)

Yorkshire pudding is the traditional accompaniment to a roast prime rib dinner. Popular not just in Yorkshire but throughout England, Yorkshire pudding was traditionally made by pouring the batter into a roasting pan and cooking it along with the meat. Baking it in the same pan after the roast has been removed captures all of the flavor, but lets you cut out a lot of the fat. Yorkshire pudding is often topped with a gravy or pan jus.

6 to 8 servings

Ingredients

  • Flour -- 2 cups
  • Salt -- 1 teaspoon
  • Eggs, beaten -- 6
  • Milk -- 2 1/2 cups
  • Pan drippings from Roast Prime Rib

Method

  1. In a large bowl, beat together the flour, salt, eggs and milk until all lumps are removed and the batter is smooth. Chill for at least 4 hours or overnight. It is important that the batter be very cold.
  2. Preheat oven 425ºF. Remove all but about 1/4 cup of fat from the pan used to roast a prime rib. Get the pan hot in the oven.
  3. Remove the pan from the oven. Whisk the batter to get it smooth, then pour it all at once into the hot roasting pan. Return the pan to the oven and bake 20 to 25 minutes, or until the pudding is puffed and lightly browned. Serve immediately.

Variations

  • For Individual Puddings: Instead of using a roasting pan, pour some of the pan drippings into 6 to 8 wells of a 12-serving muffin tin and heat the pan in the oven. Pour equal amounts of batter into each well and bake until puffed, 10 to 15 minutes.

Comments

Traditionally in Yorkshire,the Yorkshire pudding was served as a starter before the roasted meat.it was served with gravy.This was mainly because this was the cheaper ingredients of the roast and saved buying as much meat as this filled people up first.

It also tastes quite nice served as a dessert with sugar on top.

Another English classic "toad in the hole" can be made using the same batter, essentially you let sausages cook in a roasting tin about halfway (so fat has been released but not burnt onto tin) and then pour the batter into the roasting tin with the sausages. The batter will then rise and the sausages cook together.