International Recipes and Cooking Around the World

Diwali: Recipes and Traditions

Children lighting Diwali lamps

Image Creative Commons by Pradip Mahato

Diwali is the Indian Festival of Lights. The holiday generally falls in October or November and celebrates the triumph of good over evil, light over darkness. The force of good is symbolized with candles, lanterns, elaborate light displays and lots of fireworks.

While originally a Hindu celebration, Diwali, or Deepavali as it is known in southern India, is celebrated by Indians of all religions. Diwali traditions have spread around the world with Indian immigrant communities to places like Singapore, Malaysia, the UK and the United States.

The celebration is spread over five days, with the Diwali festival of lights falling on the third day and coinciding with the new moon. In 2016, Diwali begins on October 30.

The Diwali festival is often compared to Christmas celebrations in the West. It is a time for family and friends to gather and exchange small gifts. The holiday is especially notable for the popularity of sweets.

Diwali Recipes

Try these recipes for Diwali. Visit our India page and make a full Indian feast.

Gulab Jamun

Bowl of gulab jamun

(South Asian milk ball sweet in rose-scented syrup)